Grammatical Cases


Grammatical Cases
For those of you who have never studied Latin, or German, or a host of other languages known as inflected languages, grammatical cases are noun and pronoun inflections which indicate the relationship of terms in a sentence to one another. In English, cases are now only important to indicate possession (cat/cat's, it/its) and in pronouns (she/her, who/whom). However, some languages have up to fifteen cases. You just might want to have this list on hand if you ever take a trip to Finland, for instance. Or then again, maybe not. At any rate, while most non-linguists are familiar with only a handful of these cases at most, there are in fact over fifty distinct cases that I have been able to track down.
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Phrontistery dictionary. 2013.

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